In this issue
Welcome
NHS rainbow badges launched
International honour for clinician
Blood test could predict stillbirth
Water bottle refill machines
Trailblazing brain cancer service
Calling all superheroes
Friends and Family Test – January
Four years at the top
Trust coaching scheme wins award
Award for LEAP team
A model patient
A lesson in sleep
Breakthrough in Crohn’s trial
12 March – Healthcare Science Week roadshow
13 March – Carers network day
14 May – free abdominal pain seminar
Donate
Welcome

I am delighted that, for the fourth year running, Guy’s and St Thomas’ has the highest staff engagement score for combined acute and community trusts in the national 2018 NHS Staff Survey.

 

We have outstanding staff working across our Trust in many teams and roles who enable us to provide great care for our patients. Their continued dedication and commitment makes our Trust a great place to work.

 

While we have much to celebrate in our survey results, there are areas where we need to do better. Staff tell us that we need to do more to improve the experience of our black, Asian, and minority ethnic staff. We must also do more to ensure that behaviours are always in line with our Trust values and act quickly where that is not the case.

 

In this month’s e-GiST, find out about the NHS rainbow badges that we’ve introduced for staff to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT+) patients, visitors and colleagues, and read how we are reducing waste by introducing water bottle refill stations.

 

Amanda Pritchard
Chief Executive

What's new?
 
NHS rainbow badges launched

Staff at Guy’s and St Thomas’ are wearing NHS rainbow badges to support lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT+) patients.

 

The scheme was spearheaded by Evelina London and is now being rolled out across the Trust, following a successful pilot at the children’s hospital.

 

Evelina London has also created a toolkit to encourage other NHS organisations to implement the scheme. The project has been backed by the Health Secretary Matt Hancock, who regularly wears the badge, and Strictly Come Dancing star and former Evelina London paediatrician, Dr Ranj.

 
International honour for clinician

Critical care physician Dr Manu Shankar-Hari has been awarded a Fellowship by the International Sepsis Forum. The Lowry Fink Fellowship is awarded to one scientist worldwide each year for their research in this area.

 

Sepsis is a serious complication of infection. It occurs when the body’s immune system goes into overdrive in response to an infection. Without quick treatment, it can lead to multiple organ failure and death.

 

Dr Shankar-Hari’s research explores ways to improve outcomes in critically ill adult sepsis patients. He says: "This Fellowship allows me to interact with international leaders in sepsis research and learn from their work. My hope is that this will help my research to lead to benefits for patients.”

 
Blood test could predict stillbirth

Researchers from Guy’s and St Thomas’ and King’s College London have found a bile acid blood test can measure the risk of stillbirth in women with a common liver disorder.


ICP is a liver disorder affecting around 5,300 pregnancies every year in the UK. The condition causes a build-up of bile acids in the blood and women with the condition are often offered an early delivery to prevent stillbirth.


Professor Catherine Williamson, who led the study, says: “We can now identify those women at the highest risk of stillbirth and consider interventions to specifically prevent stillbirth. We will also be able to reassure a large number of women that they are not at increased risk of stillbirth.”

 
Water bottle refill machines

Guy’s and St Thomas’ is supporting the capital’s push for greater sustainability by introducing water bottle refill stations. The Trust estimates that the four stations will prevent the unnecessary use and disposal of 150,000 plastic bottles every year.

 

Two of the refill points were provided by The Mayor of London and the charity #Oneless as part of the London Drinking Fountain Fund. The other two fountains were funded by Bywaters and UNISON.

 

The refill stations are positioned in South Wing and next to The Riverside Restaurant at St Thomas’, and Tower Wing and Atrium Two at Guy’s.

 
Trailblazing brain cancer service

A specialist team at Guy’s Cancer has treated its 100th brain cancer patient with a sophisticated form of radiotherapy. The treatment targets tumours to the closest half a millimetre.

 

Stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) is a very precise form of radiation therapy. Despite the use of the word ‘surgery’ in its name, it avoids the need to go under the surgeon’s knife.

 

A focused high-intensity beam of radiation is used to target the tumour. This can help to preserve healthy tissue and reduce the time patients spend on the treatment table.

Support us
 
Calling all superheroes

St Thomas' Abseil is back for 2019. Whether you’re an abseiling veteran or a newbie, be a hero and join us on Friday 10 May to abseil 160ft down the front of St Thomas' Hospital.

 

You’ll be raising vital funds to provide lifesaving equipment and home comforts for our patients, while soaking up fantastic views of Westminster.

 

Whether you’re doing it alone or as part of a team, join in the fun and sign up now.

How are we doing?
 
Friends and Family Test – January

Most patients who completed the Friends and Family Test questionnaire in January recommend the care at Guy’s and St Thomas’ to their loved ones:

 

 

 

  • 95% of inpatients and day case/surgery patients
  • 89% of women receiving maternity care
  • 98% of patients using our community services
  • 92% of outpatients
  • 90% of A&E patients
  • 94% of patients using our transport service
 
Four years at the top

Guy’s and St Thomas’ has the highest staff engagement score for combined acute and community trusts for the fourth consecutive year, according to the national 2018 NHS Staff Survey results.

 

We scored better than the national average on six out of 10 themes, and matched the average on two themes. A total of 87% of our staff who responded are happy with the standard of care we provide, compared to the national average of 70%.

 

Julie Screaton, Chief People Officer, says: “We’ll continue to work with staff across the Trust, investing in their development and creating positive working conditions for them to flourish.”

 
Trust coaching scheme wins award

Congratulations to the coaching and mentoring project team at Guy’s and St Thomas’ for winning a Learning Award.


Staff are matched with a coach within the Trust who they are encouraged to meet every month for six months.


The team won the People Development Programme of the Year (public sector) award, which recognises large-scale schemes that show demonstrable improvement.

 
Award for LEAP team

Congratulations to the Lambeth Early Action Partnership (LEAP) Health Team who won at the London Maternity and Midwifery Festival 2019.

 

They were recognised for the Team Award for helping to improve the lives of babies, young children and their families.

 

LEAP is a Big Lottery funded programme that aims to improve outcomes for children in Lambeth, from conception to their fourth birthday.

In the news
 
A model patient

BBC South East Today and Evening Standard highlighted the story of Amy Lee, who received life-saving heart surgery as a baby at Evelina London.

 

She is now a healthy eight-year-old and child model who recently walked at New York and London fashion weeks.

 

Amy’s mum, Jennie, says: “She just lights up when she’s on the catwalk. I’m so proud of her, especially given what she’s been through.”

 
A lesson in sleep

Sleep experts from Evelina London have designed lesson plans for schools to help tackle sleep problems among young people.

 

Dr Mike Farquhar, consultant in children's sleep medicine, was interviewed by BBC Breakfast about the importance of sleep. He says: “Sleep is the foundation of your physical and mental health. It’s like an MOT for your brain and body every night of your life.”

 

Dr Charlie Tyack, clinical psychologist at Evelina London, was also interviewed about the project on BBC radio, which was broadcast from local stations across the country.

 
Breakthrough in Crohn’s trial

Evening Standard reported that patients with Crohn’s disease are to be given the chance of having their immune cells ‘reprogrammed’ in a bid to beat the chronic bowel condition.

 

A clinical trial is due to start at Guy’s and St Thomas’ within six months after a breakthrough in the laboratory by its researchers.

 

Professor Graham Lord, the lead researcher, says: “This is the next frontier in cell therapy, as we’re going beyond treating the symptoms of Crohn’s disease and trying to reset the immune system to address the condition.”

Key dates
 
12 March – Healthcare Science Week roadshow

Healthcare Science Week aims to promote the amazing work of healthcare science professionals and the difference they make to patients' lives.

We will be celebrating in Central Hall at St Thomas’ Hospital, from 11am to 3pm, on Tuesday 12 March - come along to find out more.

For more information about the annual event, please email katie.thomasson@gstt.nhs.uk.

 
13 March – Carers network day

Are you an unpaid carer? We're offering a free one-day course for anyone who cares for a friend or relative who is a patient at Guy’s and St Thomas’ or lives in Lambeth and Southwark.

 

It will take place on Wednesday 13 March from 9.30am to 3.30pm in the Sherman Education Centre, 4th floor Southwark Wing, Guy’s Hospital.

 

To take part in the course or to find out more, please email simulation@gstt.nhs.uk or call 020 7188 7147.

 
14 May – free abdominal pain seminar

Our next free health seminar for Foundation Trust members will be held in the Robens Suite, Guy’s Hospital, on Tuesday 14 May.

The seminar will take place from 6pm to 7.30pm and includes presentations, a question and answer session and refreshments.

Places are allocated on a first come, first served basis so book as soon as possible. Email members@gstt.nhs.uk or phone 0800 731 0319.